Steve Zach's blog

United Way Thrive Money Basics

Learn from a United Way Thrive coach about some techniques to get ahead on your finances and how to take advantage of the money you save. Meet on Thursday, February 16 at 1:30 p.m. Please register by calling the library at 281-484-2036 or by visiting the library's events calendar.

New computer class: Microsoft Word

Our regular basic skills computer classes continue each Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. (upcoming topics this month are Internet Basics, Internet Security and Files and Folders). In addition, we are happy to be able to host a new class this month: Microsoft Word Basics, led by volunteer Sony Philip on Thursday, January 19 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. To register for any of these classes, call us at 281-484-2036 or click on the classes you would like to attend in our events calendar.

Learn how to make your own rain barrel

Rainfall has been plentiful for most parts of the past year, but this is Houston -- weather patterns change quickly. Your garden or foundation will need watering at some point. Rather than running up your water bill, join Teresa See, Harris County Master Gardener in the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, on Saturday, January 14 at 10:30 a.m. to learn about the process of capturing, diverting, and storing rainwater for future use. Teresa will also show you how to make your own rain barrel at home. Free! Call us at 281-484-2036 to register or sign up on the library's events calendar.

Share a Book (or the Ability to Read It)

Christopher and Walter Dean MyersThis story from StoryCorps, told by beloved author Walter Dean Myers, is an excellent reminder that someone close to us -- a co-worker, family member or friend  -- may desire assistance with reading, and also a reminder to never miss an opportunity to read aloud. Volunteer as a tutor through the library literacy program or call Literacy Advance of Houston or the

Wordless picture books for class or home

Picture books without words offer a variety of activities for both ESL students and basic literacy learners who have children. Better yet, most of these books have such engaging stories that they are appropriate for learners with children at any age.  Those learners in a class who do not have children would find them interesting as well.
 
For example, have ESL students look over a few pages in pairs or as a class to identify key characters and events. Review this vocabulary.

Wordless picture books for class or home

Picture books without words offer a variety of activities for both ESL students and basic literacy learners who have children. Better yet, most of these books have such engaging stories that they are appropriate for learners with children at any age, and those learners in a class who do not have children would find them interesting as well.
 
For example, have ESL students look over a few pages in pairs or as a class to identify key characters and events. Review this vocabulary.

Ten tips -- ESL

1.       Review frequently, even doing some of the same activities more than once.

2.       Have students do the majority of the talking in your tutoring sessions. Activities #8, 14-22, 28, 29, and 54-61 in the book “Teaching Adults: An ESL Resource Book” are especially good for this. The teacher’s resource files from “LifePrints: ESL for Adults” also are very good.

Ten tips - literacy

Hang out with Junkyard Dan

It’s hard to find books written for adults at a very easy level with interesting plot lines and characters.  Not any more. Find such a set of books right here! The Junkyard Dan series, a set of eight books with accompanying workbooks, will keep you and your student turning the pages. Even better, Taping for the Blind here in Houston has recorded these books and put them on CD for literacy students.  Your student can read a chapter or two, finish some of the puzzles in the workbook for that section, re-read the chapters, and then re-read them again along with the CD.

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