Literacy

Ten tips -- ESL

1.       Review frequently, even doing some of the same activities more than once.

2.       Have students do the majority of the talking in your tutoring sessions. Activities #8, 14-22, 28, 29, and 54-61 in the book “Teaching Adults: An ESL Resource Book” are especially good for this. The teacher’s resource files from “LifePrints: ESL for Adults” also are very good.

Hang out with Junkyard Dan

It’s hard to find books written for adults at a very easy level with interesting plot lines and characters.  Not any more. Find such a set of books right here! The Junkyard Dan series, a set of eight books with accompanying workbooks, will keep you and your student turning the pages. Even better, Taping for the Blind here in Houston has recorded these books and put them on CD for literacy students.  Your student can read a chapter or two, finish some of the puzzles in the workbook for that section, re-read the chapters, and then re-read them again along with the CD.

New Tutors

English as a Second Language
Training Sessions
More Information About Tutoring

Words are all around us. We can use reading, writing or spoken language skills to enrich almost any aspect of our lives. No one is unable to use words. Some of us use spoken English better than we read and write; others read and write better. Regardless, all adults have many skills and experiences involving language already. Volunteer tutors help adults enhance the skills they already have through reading, writing or spoken English. An initial training orientation provides tutors with everything needed to begin, and very user-friendly lesson plans and additional training opportunities throughout the tutoring process help tutors continue to share their knowledge of written or spoken English words.

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