Childrens

The Magic of Mythology

With The Lightning Thief coming to theaters this President’s Day weekend, I thought this would be a good chance to cover mythologies. Myths are part of every culture and society. According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary 'myth' is defined as “a usually traditional story of ostensibly historical events that serves to unfold part of the world view of a people or explain a practice, belief, or natural phenomenon.” To put it in plain English, a myth is a story that helps to explain events, both real and imaginary. Myths might help to explain why you should listen to your parents or how lightning is produced.

Celebrate Black History Month with Books!

I have created this booklist to include both non-fiction and picture books for elementary school students. Often, picture books are discouraged for children who are past pre-school. This booklist demonstrates that picture books are an effective tool for children of every age, and especially when teaching historical material.  

 

 Africans in America, 1619-1865  by Kay Melchisedech Olson

 

2009-2010 Texas Bluebonnet Award

 

2009-2010 Texas Bluebonnet Award  Winner:

 

All-Time Classic Comics: Calvin and Hobbes

Just recently Bill Watterson, creator Calvin and Hobbes, was interviewed for the first time in 15 years. This reminded me of how the beloved series served as comical and refreshing bibliotherapy when I was frustrated with pre-tween woes. I have my brother to thank for my first exposure to comics with a copy of Calvin and Hobbes. You can read the Bill Watterson interview here.

good books for grown-ups

This week I was asked, "Are there any kids' books that an adult might enjoy?" Hmmm. and the answer would be: Duh. Let me quote the great author of "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe," C.S. Lewis, "No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally – and often far more – worth reading at the age of fifty and beyond."

You know, when I buy books as Christmas presents for my mom and sister, who are older than me, and I *am* a grown-up, (even though the waiter at dinner tonight accused me of being a kid 'cause I ordered chicken tenders), I don't buy "adult" books, I get them kid or teen books. In fact, I hardly ever read "adult" books. Out of the last 132 books I have read, only nine were "adult."

So, you ask, what kid books would a grown up like? Here are a few, which I will personally guarantee.

Favorites from the Winners Circle

Blue Ribbon

With all the awards being presented to various authors and illustrators, some people might be wondering what books top my own personal list. As with almost every librarian, it is sometimes hard to choose just one title. But, I’ve done my best to keep each award to just that! What are your own award winning favorites? Post in the comments and tell us why!

Coretta Scott King Book Awards Announced

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards were designed to commemorate the life and works of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and to honor Mrs. Coretta Scott King for her courage and determination to continue the work for peace.  The Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognize outstanding books for young adults and children by African American authors and illustrators that reflect the African American experience. 

get ready for new movies

A few of the new movies coming out this spring are based on children's books. There's always the debate over whether to read the book first or see the movie first. Usually the book is better than the movie, so I like to see the movie first so that I won't be disappointed. My daughter, however, refuses to see the movie before she's read the book.

So here's a few books you better check out or put on hold, as the case may be, soon.

Due out in February:   

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