Movies

For Great Cinema, HCPL & Kanopy Have You Covered

 

Thousands of Independent and Classic Films from the Criterion Collection Now Streaming Free with your Library Card

Your selection of videos at Harris County Public Library has just grown by over 25,000 titles. HCPL recently added the streaming video service, Kanopy, to its digital roster. Kanopy focuses on independent films, critically acclaimed documentaries and classic cinema from the renowned Criterion Collection. Now all the movies you see on those 100 Greatest Films of All Time lists, but have never seen on-screen are available to you free of charge 24/7 with your HCPL library card.

Reading, Learning, and Community Involvement: Gulf Coast Reads @ Jacinto City Branch Library

Jacinto City Branch Library is hosting two programs this week as part of the Gulf Coast Reads series of events. This endeavor provides an opportunity to participate in a community-wide discussion by reading and sharing views about the same book. Sharing this goal encourages community members to make reading, learning and community involvement a lifelong pursuit.

Saturday Family Movie at Jacinto City Branch Library

Join us

Saturday, October 7th, 2017 at 1:00 pm

for the Saturday Family Movie!

Movie Reel PNGIn honor of Hispanic Heritage Month we are showing the movie Cesar Chavez, starring Michael Pena as the inspiring Hispanic hero.

Movie night

This Friday, July 14 is teen movie night at High Meadows Branch Library. Join us at 3:00 for films, frivolity, and fun.

film reels

Photo courtesy of Bill Smith

We'll Always Have...

I recently saw a new book that was added to the HCPL collection.  The title caught my attention because it references one of my all-time favorite movies.  In fact, I consider it one of those perfect films, where everything works together.  Story, setting, performances, direction.  It’s one that I’ve seen over and over again and I still find myself drawn to it.

The book is We’ll Always Have Casablanca by Noah Isenberg.

Asian Pacific Heritage Month at Northwest

May is Asian Pacific Heritage Month. To celebrate, Northwest staff would like to shine a spotlight on the New Zealand film industry. Here is a small selection of films currently availabe in the Harris County Library's collection.

Women's History Month: Female Directors

kathryn bigelowIn 2009, Kathryn Bigelow made history by becoming the first woman to win an Academy Award for Best Director. She won for her film The Hurt Locker, about an army bomb squad unit during the Iraq War. Since her win in 2009, no woman has received a Best Director nomination. In fact, in the history of the Academy Awards, only three other women received nominations for Best Director: Lina Wertmuller for Seven Beauties in 1976, Jane Campion for The Piano in 1993, and Sofia Coppola for Lost in Translation in 2003.

Although this minimalistic showing of women in the Best Director category does present, women’s involvement in the film industry as directors is not quite as dire as the Academy Awards would suggest. For years, women have fought to hold as strong a presence behind the camera as they have had in front of it. They have directed cult classics and blockbusters, genre-setters and award winners, visual masterpieces and character-driven films. In short, women have been breaking down barriers in film as they have in every other profession, and they will continue to do so until there are no barriers left. 

Women’s History Month (celebrated annually each March) may be coming to a close, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy an excellent movie ably directed by a woman. Below, I have listed just a few of the women working in the field, along with some of their most well-known films. Check out the list to see a fraction of what women have contributed to film over the years.

Moving Pictures

We’ve all done it.  At one time or another, we’ve had to pack up and move.  No matter what situation or location we’re moving to, it can be a stressful time.  And not just the packing and moving part.  There’s always the question of adjusting to a new place and new people and maybe an entirely new job.  Whether across town or across the country or even another part of the world, a move is exciting and frightening and invigorating and frustrating – all at once.

89th Academy Awards


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Last night, this year’s movie awards season concluded at the 89th Academy Awards. The ceremony opened with a burst of energy with Justin Timberlake singing his Oscar-nominated and catchy hit “Can’t Stop the Feeling”. Host Jimmy Kimmel carried the momentum along with good natured jokes about the attendees (including initiating a sympathy standing ovation for Meryl Streep, a “lackluster actress”), pre-taped gags (nominees reading mean tweets about themselves), and tiny parachutes carrying snacks and candy periodically falling from the ceiling.

The funniest segment of the telecast came when Kimmel surprised a group of tourists on a Hollywood tour bus by bringing them into the theater, walking them along the front row, and introducing them to the A-list celebrities. I think we all wanted to be Gary from Chicago as he met Denzel Washington and took a selfie with Mahershala Ali’s brand new Oscar.

The biggest surprise of the night came at the end of the telecast when Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, who were there to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Bonnie & Clyde, came out to announce the Best Picture winner. After opening the envelope and stalling for a minute, they announced La La Land as the big winner of the night.

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