Dr. Seuss

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss

HBDTheodor Seuss Geisel was an American author best known for authoring more than 60 children's books under the name Dr. Seuss. Dr. Seuss was born on March 22, 1904. Today we celebrate his birthday with an after school craft at 4:30 PM in the Children's Area of the library. 
To see what other fun events we have planned for March check out our Online Calendar including Spring Break Events.

Celebrate Dr. Seuss All Week Long!

Friday, March 2nd  is the birthday of Dr. Seuss!  The day is commonly referred to as Read Across America Day (RAA). It is celebrated across the country each year as a way to honor the literary genius of Theodore Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss).  In the Children's Area, a Creation Station is set up on the reference desk for your child to complete a simple craft and fun worksheet based on popular Dr. Seuss books. For more information about  RAA, please visit the National Education Association website.  And remember, "you are never too old, too wacky or wild, to pick up a book and read to a childl"!

Celebrate Read Across America

I love reading and, I try my hardest to inspire that love in the next generation. March is Read Across America Month where we celebrate reading with our children. Here at Evelyn Meador we have scheduled magician and educator Julian Franklin to present his show “Reading Rocks (with Socks and Fox) on March 3rd at 2:00 PM. After celebrating Dr.

Celebrate Read Across America Day with The Cat in the Hat and the Arandas' Mascot "Goat"

Read Across America is an annual celebration created by the National Education Association and promotes the excitement of reading and books to children and teens everywhere. Here at the South Houston Branch Library we invite you to celebrate Read Across America Day during our celebration next Thursday, March 1 at 4:30 PM. Children will have the opportunity to enjoy a cake sponsored by Arandas Bakery, prepare their own Dr. Seuss snacks, and participate in fun games. "The Cat in the Hat" and the Arandas mascot "The Goat" will be present and available to take pictures with children. We invite you to come and celebrate the magic of reading with us.

Special Storytime Party

We are having a storytime party, but for whom? 

Everyone is sure to have Seussational time as we celebrate the life and work of a man with many names. Of whom am I speaking? The beloved children's author Theodor Seuss Geisel, of course. You've never heard of him? Well, that is because he went by several nom de plumes. He wrote one book, Because a Little Bug Went Ka-choo!, as Rosetta Stone. He also wrote several early readers as Theo LeSieg, but you probably know him as the one and only Dr. Seuss!


Read Across America Day

Join us under the Tuffula trees for a celebration of the world of Dr. Seuss including stories, crafts, games, snacks and fun!

Date: Wednesday, March 1

Time: 4:00-5:30 p. m.

All ages are welcome. Costumes encouraged!

Dr. Seuss Birthday Party


We will be having a birthday party for Dr. Seuss on Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 4:00pm.  Join us for yummy birthday cake and a movie based on a beloved Dr. Seuss character.  

What You Might Not Know About Dr. Seuss

Many of you are familiar with the beloved children's books written by Dr. Seuss. What you may not be aware of is that "Dr. Seuss" was a nom de plume. His given name was Theodor Seuss Geisel. 

Greasy Grimy Gopher Guts: Poetry for Children

Photo Credit: Duncecap from reproducinggenius.comI am only writing this post because a couple of weeks ago I more or less prostrated myself soliciting topic suggestions, so I feel obligated...obligated and bitter.

I want to make one thing perfectly clear: I do not condone inflicting poetry upon innocent and impressionable minds. Read your kids books on Java Script, or marketing, or advanced particle physics, anything but poetry. It will only lead them to lives of frustration and heartache--not to mention insanely expensive and useless liberal arts degrees.

Notes on Amphigouri*: Slithy Toves, Granfalloons**, and Cromulentishness***

Illustration of the Jabberwock by Sir John Tenniel

Human language ranks even above the much-vaunted opposable thumb in my book. Sure, thumbs came in handy for our ancestors when it came to throwing spears at bison and such, but I think we can all agee that it was when humans developed the ability to order a mastodon sirloin rare with a side of sloth that things really started to take off progress-wise.

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