history

A New Take on History

A History of the World in 100 ObjectsA customer recently recommended a book that gives you a different view of learning history: A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor.  I've added it to my to-read list.  

Understand History, Understand Today

Jerusalem: the BiographySo many of today's conflicts across the world are based on the conflicts of yesterday.  Pick up a book at the library that helps you understand the underlying reasons behind it all.  One I'm reading right now feels more like an epic novel than a dry textbook.  Check out Jerusalem: the Biography by Simon Sebag Montefiore. 

Houston's Ever-Changing Cityscape

Last Sunday, 70 years of history disappeared in ten seconds.  What was once the downtown Houston Foley's (and later Macy's) department store was demolished in ten seconds to make way for an office tower. Foley's opened its doors in the 1940s and was a popular place to shop for many Houston locals. Its popularity as a shopping destination slowly declined as the decades passed and the land was purchased by an outside company. It is just one of many changes to the downtown Houston landscape through the years. If you're curious about Houston's architectural history, these books will lead you on a tour back down the streets of the past.

Know More about the Presidents

Don't Know Much about the American PresidentsDo you know that Andrew Jackson would be irate to see himself on the $20 bill?  Do you know just what George Washington's false teeth were made of?  (Not wood!)  Check your Presidential trivia and learn more with this easy-to-read and enlightening book: Don't Know Much about the American Presidents by Kenneth Davis.

150 Years Ago, President Abraham Lincoln, Issued The Emancipation Proclamation

On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, making all slaves in seceding states free as of January 1, 1863. If you are interested in learning more about this topic checkout some of the books that I have listed below.

The Emancipation Proclamation  Stephen Krensky.

London in the Limelight

Have the Olympic games piqued your interest in the host city? Bring these books home from the library and learn about all things London:

History Lessons

Brush up on your American history before the Fourth of July by reading America: The Story of Us written by Kevin Baker for the History channel. The book is a comprehensive look at our shared history and is told through short essays, eye-catching graphics, vivid pictures, and charted statistics.

“Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” Traveling Exhibit Visits Cy-Fair

Presiden Abraham Lincoln from Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes. Courtesy Flickr Commons and Library of CongressBeginning December 28, Cy-Fair College Branch Library will host a unique traveling exhibition focusing on President Abraham Lincoln’s struggle to meet the political and constitutional challenges of the most turbulent era in the nation’s history.

Using period photographs, posters, historical documents and artifacts--including the Bible used during Lincoln’s first inauguration, “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” explores how the president used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the war—the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties.

Ten Years Ago

Many of us remember where we were ten years ago on September 11th.  The news unfolded before us in real time - on TV, the radio, in the newspapers, and online.  We can recall exactly where we were and what we were doing when we first learned about the attacks.  In that way, we all have a personal account of that day.  

These books retell personal experiences from people who were directly caught up in the attack and its aftermath.  Each one is based on a specific perspective from a specific place, but they all recount the history of that day that changed the nation and the world.

Deep In The Heart of Texas

This year marks the 175th anniversary of Texas independence.  Did you know Texas became its own nation after it won independence in 1836?  The new nation was officially called the Republic of Texas and lasted almost ten years.  The Lone Star flag was created in Montgomery County and was adopted as the official national flag.  Texas even had foreign diplomats and its own embassy in London before it was annexed into the United States in 1845.

Learn more fascinating facts about Texas history with these titles:

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