history

Fun4Seniors Trip to the National Museum of Funeral History

On Wednesday 10/31, KingwoodLibrary staff joined HarrisCounty Precinct4 Fun4Seniors on a trip to the Museum of Funeral History. The group viewed exhibits about presidential funerals. Also, they learned about the evolution of funeral vehicles, customs, & traditions from around the world.

Fun4Seniors is operated by Harris County Precinct 4 Senior Adult Program and is open to ages 50 years and older. Transportation is free to and from Kingwood Branch Library. For registration, payment, and event information please contact Fun4Seniors by calling 281-893-3726.

 

Take a Trip Back to 1968 This Saturday, Oct. 6th!

This Saturday, the Barbara Bush Branch Library will host a special event, Living History: 1968 with our partners from the Tomball Community Library. It's been 50 years since 1968, which was a year jam packed with major historical events, important pop culture developments and space exploration. Join us to learn all about this pivotal year in our history.

The exhibit will be open this Saturday, Oct. 6th from 10:30am-2:30pm. 

Book Hunters in Brief #114: Women's History Month

For readers, one of the more gratifying developments in the last several decades is that many historians have shifted their perspective from a bird's eye view of great men and events (and it was almost invariably men) to a ground level view of the way great events have affected, and were affected by, what in a less enlightened era were sometimes called "common folk."

Book Hunters in Brief #113: Presidential Stories

With Presidents' Day just recently passed, and the race for the White House at full gallop, Book Hunters in Brief offers these presidential reads.

8-Bit Beginnings

Pack your bags, you're going on a video game nostalgia trip. Read, watch, and listen to these titles to remember the joys of your youth. If you're too young to remember the golden age of video games, it's time for an education. Learn all you need to know about the dawn of video games with these titles:

Writer Spotlight: Erik Larson

If you enjoy historical nonfiction, don't miss the work of New York native Erik Larson. Larson's brand of narrative nonfiction has been a hit on many bestseller lists, starting with a book written in 1999 recalling the Great Storm of 1900 in Galveston. He currently occupies the #10 spot on the New York Times nonfiction list with his latest book,

The Story of Astoria

Astoria by Peter StarkHave you ever been to Astoria, Oregon?  You've seen it if you watched the movies Kindergarten Cop, The Goonies, Free Willy, and many more.  I happened upon it driving one day (which isn't that easy to do), and I was rendered speechless by the beauty of entering it by the bridge over the Columbia River.  I imagine John Jacob Astor's expedition group had much the same reaction to this unspoiled, unsettled area in the early 1800's.  Read about their thrilling and often tragic adventure in a new book called Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire by Peter Stark.

When History Isn't History: Legacies of the Great War

Marching toward the Battle of the SommeRegrettably for humankind, the “War to End All Wars” did not live up to that hopelessly hopeful appellation. In fact, most historians will tell you that it and the treaty that ended it, were the chief causes of the Second World War which remains the only war in human history to surpass it in the cost of human life.

As you will have heard by now, over the next four or so years, the world will be commemorating the hundred year anniversaries of the events of what has come to be known—exactly because it could not measure up to that overly optimistic sobriquet—World War I.

Book Hunters in Brief #23: Memorial Day

Harris County Public Library owes a debt of gratitude to the members of the U.S. Armed Services both past and present, as well as to their families. We would like to take this opportunity to say thank you.

The History of a Language

Would you be surprised to find out Shakespeare's works are written in Modern English? It's true! Modern English started in about 1450. Granted, Shakespeare's time included the early years of the Modern English period (1450-1800), while we live in the Late Modern English period (1800 onward). There are some differences, but not many. See for yourself

Syndicate content