National Poetry Month

Blackout Poetry Program!

  Celebrate National Poetry Month with us!  Using a sharpie and newspaper or a page out of a book, black out the words you don't want, leave the words you do and the result is poetry created by you!  All supplies provided!  This FREE program is for tweens and teens ages 10 – 18 and meets in room L129 on Wednesday, April 5th at 5pm!

Book Hunters in Brief #120: Children's Poetry for National Poetry Month

Not only is it a fairly inarguable fact that children and young adults write the best poetry, they are also--for many of the same reasons--the best readers of poetry. In both cases, their abilities have to do with an intuitive sense of possibilities: in language, in imagination, in life and the world around them. It is also a fairly inarguable fact that the world would be a better, or at least more interesting, place if more of us could carry a child's poetic sensibility into adulthood. We just don't, for many, probably valid, reasons. Heck, most kids who grow up to be poets can't even manage it.

Book Hunters in Brief #68: Poetry for the Verse Averse

Yes, it's that time of year again when well-meaning poetry lovers insist (always with a hint of desperation in their voices) that you must read some poetry because it's National Poetry Month and it is important and it is good for you and it is fun (despite the fact that it's pretty much a universal law that if so

New Arrivals for National Poetry Month 2014

Nat'lPoMo Poster 2014It is perhaps no accident that National Poetry Month always begins on April Fools’ Day. Poetry is a foolish thing. It, more than prose in all its various forms, assumes it can draw a bead on, and ultimately make some kind of meaning (no matter how fleeting) from the messy and provisional stuff that is life in the 21st century. It is foolish because for nearly everyone but poets themselves, it has become an object of derision, and worse—indifference.

Yet, the world continues to spawn poets. Why? Because, I think, human beings, when you look at them in their best possible light, are fundamentally seekers. We are all looking for something with a big, amorphous name: grace, salvation, contentment, etc. --in short, we are looking for answers to questions we can't even quite formulate.

Cultivating A Love For The Written Word

A lot of kids don't think they like poetry that is until, they listen to someone read a book that is funny.  So, in honor of National Poetry Month, I would like to highlight two books that will tickle your funny bone. 

Poetry of America

Last month was National Poetry Month, so why am I writing this blog in May?  If you had a chance to visit the Atascocita Branch you may have noticed my display of poetry books in the children's area. I am happy to report that many children and adults checked these items out. Even though April is over and gone, I am hopeful that you will continue to explore books in this area of the library.

Monday, May 31st, our country will celebrate Memorial Day. This national holiday commemorates the U.S. soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines who died while in military service.  I have chosen books about America in honor of these brave men and women.   
 

National Poetry Month

There was a time – many, many years ago, before radio and television – that people found entertainment through reading. Not just silently to themselves, but aloud, for everyone. And not just popular novels of the day. People were hungry for education as well as entertainment. They also read the newspaper – and poetry. Almost everyone remembers learning some poems in school, and many of us probably have favorites that we can recite. Poems that touched us in a way that made us want to remember that moment, so we learned them by heart. Poems that were, in fact, made to be read aloud.

National Poetry Month: Eliot Didn't Call April the Cruelest One for Nothing

Paragraph One: In which the Author Discusses That Unpleasant After Taste. Personally, I'd opt for a National Take-A-Poet-To-Lunch Day over a whole month of funereal "celebrations” of the art.

National Poetry Month: What They Won't Tell You

Cover Art: Love, Ghosts and Facial HairOkay, I figure that headline up there sent most everybody fleeing as fast as their mouses could carry them. So, for the one or two of you who are still with me, I'm going to tell you something that no one else will.

Here it is: Poetry is not good for you, or at least not good for you in the way that most people think it is.

The fact is poetry is bad for you.

Now I know what you're saying,This guy thinks I can't see through this reverse-psychology stuff.  Despite appearances, I'm not dumb enough to think you're dumb enough to fall for that.

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