poetry

Maya Angelou 1928 - 2014

Maya Angelou was a memoirist, poet, and activist, but more significantly, she was a keen, measured public voice of a kind that is increasingly rare in this ever widening, ever more shallow puddle that is early 21st century American culture. That she became the iconic figure and social force she was is all the more remarkable when one thinks of the place and time from which she rose.

New Arrivals for National Poetry Month 2014

Nat'lPoMo Poster 2014It is perhaps no accident that National Poetry Month always begins on April Fools’ Day. Poetry is a foolish thing. It, more than prose in all its various forms, assumes it can draw a bead on, and ultimately make some kind of meaning (no matter how fleeting) from the messy and provisional stuff that is life in the 21st century. It is foolish because for nearly everyone but poets themselves, it has become an object of derision, and worse—indifference.

Yet, the world continues to spawn poets. Why? Because, I think, human beings, when you look at them in their best possible light, are fundamentally seekers. We are all looking for something with a big, amorphous name: grace, salvation, contentment, etc. --in short, we are looking for answers to questions we can't even quite formulate.

Celebrate National Poetry Month with Blackout Poetry

 

Tuesday, April 1st @ 4:30pm teens and tweens ages 12-18, or in grades 6-12, are welcome to join us as we celebrate National Poetry Month with a Blackout or Found Poetry program.  Blackout or Found Poetry uses discard book pages, newspapers, or magazine articles to create poems.  All materials will be provided by FOLK; supplies are limited.  For more information, please contact Leanne, YA Librarian, by phone, 281-360-6804 or email by clicking here.
 

Altered Books Contest Starts April 1st

Altered BooksKingwood Branch Library is happy to announce its 2nd Annual Altered Books Contest beginning April 1st through June 30th. Altered books are books that are modified or altered by any number of means to make an artistic statement. The contest is open to all ages; participants can enter into one of three categories. To participate in the contest, simply pick up a book (or supply your own) and contest form from the 2nd Floor Reference Desk.

Wait--there's more! We are also offering workshops in conjunction with our contest. Workshops are not mandatory for contest participation and are open to anyone even if they're not participating in the contest.

The Words We Tell:Poetry Workshop

Autumn has been a symbol for some not-so-happy feelings and ideas in the world of poetry for quite some time. But this doesn’t have to be so! We’re in Texas after all, and autumn means this heat is subsiding!  Give this autumn a positive association: make it a productive season for your poetry!
Israel, our Circulation Assistant would like to help! Israel has his Degree in English-Creative writing from the University of Houston where his focus was poetry. He is putting together a monthly poetry workshop for adults starting September 11,2013 so that he can share some of his knowledge. Participants will share their poems and receive constructive criticism so as to improve not only their work, but their skills as poets and writers.
So come to Northwest Library and sign up! Share your poetry, listen to the work of your friend’s and neighbors, and have a good time!

Poetry Coffeehouse

National Poetry Month April 2013Did you know?  April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate we are turning the library meeting room into a coffeehouse for an evening.  Come read and/or listen to favorite poems, old and new, next Monday, April 15, 6:00 pm, and enjoy pastries and a cup of coffee or a cool glass of lemonade.  If you write poetry, please bring something of your own to share!  This program is for all ages.

Tweens & Teens: Get Poetic @ the Library

Celebrate National Poetry Month with two awesome tween and teen programs.

First, drop by the library, find some books and create a book spine poem for our Book Spine Poetry Contest. Take a photo like the one on the left and e-mail it ata4ya@gmail.com by April 23rd. The winners will be featured on this website.

Next, get your poetry on at the Poetry Cafe. Join us on Wednesday, April 17th at 4:30 for an afternoon of poetry, yummy treats and lively discussion. Bring your own poetry or just something you love to read to share with the group. If you don't feel like reading it aloud, someone will be on hand to give it the Poetry Slam treatment.

Poetry Debut

Rise and shine your debut has come for Northwest Branch library. April is called poetry Month.
We want to celebrate by asking Young Adults and Homeschoolers who like poetry to participate in this event.  All you need to do is bring your own poetry, or read a poem by someone else. Come see Gwendolyn and sign up. The date of your debut will be April twentieth at 1:30 PM in the meeting room. Now don’t be shy, this is a time to have fun.

Join WITS and HCPL in Celebrating National Poetry Month with A Poem A Day

WITS Poem a Day logoWriters in the Schools (WITS), is a local nonprofit organization that sends professional poets, fiction writers and playwrights into over 350 area schools to help children, K - 12,  discover the "pleasure and power of reading and writing." Each year in April, WITS celebrates National Poetry Month by sharing the poems of some of its many talented students through its A Poem A Day project.

 We at Harris County Public Library are excited to once again participate in this year’s event. Starting this Monday, April 1 and running through the month, fans of HCPL’s Facebook page will get to read these amazing poems.

Don’t miss a single one. ‘Like’ us on Facebook now (and as an added bonus you’ll get library news, information on upcoming library events, new title announcements, and other fun and interesting stuff with a bookish bent.

Poetry in Motion (Pictures): Movies Based on Poems

For Colored Girls audiobook coverAm I the only one who thinks it’s a bit sad that Beowulf—one of the oldest surviving poems in English (albeit of the Ye Olde kind)—has made the jump to the silver screen with more youthful vigor and a far larger budget than…say…I dunno…something…anything...written in the intervening 1300 years? Granted Beowulf has somewhat more of the kind of stuff that both mead-drinking, horns-on-the-helmet-types, and popcorn-munching 21st century cineastes alike tend to prize in their entertainments, namely: monsters “gorged and bloodied” and “gloating over the raw corpses” of several buff but faceless actor/waiters in gore harvests of cameronian  proportions, and the requisite buxomly bewitching servant girl whose only real function in the story is to be buxomly bewitching so as to test our noble hero’s proto-democratic leanings and to make sure that no one takes all the male-bonding the *ahem* wrong way. Granted, too, that unless you’re French and/or a Comp Lit major, the vague existential dread engendered by finding a dead curlew while on a walk in the sun-dappled silence of a suburban forest that is the essential plotline of every poem written since 1950, does not make for edge-of-the-seat cinema.

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