Radio

Name that Tune!

tv pictureDo you ever find yourself watching a television show when suddenly you hear a great song playing in the background or you hear a new song on the radio and you keep driving around the block to discover the artist?

Well, the next time that happens, check out a few free apps and websites that will find the song and artist in just a few clicks. You can even find songs you hear in advertisements.  

 

On the Air...

In 1979, there was a hit record titled Video Killed the Radio Star.  That idea is kind of funny to me now.  Radio may not be the big influence it once was, it doesn’t seem to be disappearing.  Yes, in the first half of the 20th century, radio had a much bigger role of our lives.  The radio provided the kind of programming we have on TV today.  There were sitcoms, police dramas, adventure series, soap operas, variety shows, news, and even gossip shows.  And in between all those were segments devoted to the hit songs of the day.

To boldly go… in your ear: Episode 2: the Radio and Other Full-cast Audio Thrills!

Thanks to Signor Marconi and his fellow inventors we have the marvelous wonders of wireless telegraphy. And what better use could be made of invisible waves traveling at the speed of light than to bring you the drama from long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away.
Star Wars Radio Drama cover    Star Wars: the Radio Drama Brian Daley turned the original 1977 two-hour film by George Lucas into a six-hour thirteen-part radio play for National Public Radio in 1981.

The Bat-Man and his Ancestors

When writer Bill Finger met artist Bob Kane at a party in 1938 he realized that he’d met a kindred spirit.  Both young men were anxious to succeed in the new publishing enterprise that was blossoming in New York at the time: comic books!  Just that year two other young men, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, had sold an idea they’d thought up in their teens to National Publications.  It was their comic strip about an extremely physically fit extraterrestrial good guy.  Superman became a publishing phenomenon, exceeding sales expectations almost faster than a speeding bullet, and National Publication wanted more. 

Bob Kane had the idea for another costumed superhero, as the genre woul

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