Shakespeare

Star Wars by way of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare's Star Wars by Ian Doescher combines the classic style of Shakespeare with George Lucas's  Star Wars episode IV: A New Hope. Wait! Don't write it off too quickly. As quirky as it sounds, the iambic pentameter and old English is rather charming in the Star Wars setting.

TROOPER 4: Pray, show me now thy papers.

OBI-WAN: Nay, thou dost not need to see his papers.            

April & Shakespeare

ShakespeareAs far as I can tell, no one has ever declared April to be International Shakespeare Month, but I think they should.  Most people agree that he was the most important playwright in the history of the English language.  He is thought to have been born around April 23, 1564, and he died April 23, 1616.  In case you would like to honor him by reading some of his plays this month, I’ve done some research and found that many people think that Shakespeare’s best-loved tragedies are Romeo&nbs

WORKING FOR WILL

What would it be like?

Happy Birthday Will

We know a lot about William Shakespeare. We have the text of most all of his plays, we have baptismal records, a will, and other legal documents, and we also have attacks, criticism and praise of his works by his contemporary playwrights. We can infer from these much of what he thought about the world. But because what he wrote is spoken by characters in his plays and poems, we have very scant evidence about his own personality. Much scholarly ink is used to interpret his works, especially his sonnets, to find out what sort of person he really was. In addition to the scholarship applied to this task there is also the imaginative works of other authors, who have used him as a character in their own books.

Kids Shake it up with Shakespeare!

Monday, April 26th 4:30pm
“Shakespeare for Kids” a play featuring live actors presented by Hampstead Theatre Company takes place on Monday, April 26, 2010 at 4:30pm in the Robin Bush Room. Audience participation is encouraged. Lots of fun is sure to ensue while children learn about some of Shakespeare’s most famous plays!  Recommended for children 6 and up.
 

SHAKESPEARE ON SCREEN

Or, Much to Do While You Wait Upon a Live Performance

Happy Birthday Will

INSULTING SHAKESPEARE

or, Toads, Beetles, Bats, Light on You! 

STARTING SHAKESPEARE

(FREE BEAR INCLUDED IN EACH BOOK)

Happy Birthday Will

 

Kids Look for these Special Events Coming to the Library Soon! You Don’t Want To Miss These Unique Programs!!

Saturday, April 17th at 2pm
Be a Puppeteer! Saturday, April 17, 2010 at 2pm in the Robin Bush Room. Children 5-12 years will create fluorescent paper hand puppets and perform behind a black light puppet stage. Master puppeteer, Jean Kuecher, will inspire the children to manipulate and speak for their puppets. Groups of 3 or 4 persons will create their own original puppet show from behind a hand puppet stage. All supplies will be provided. Children will take their own original puppet creations home.
Monday, April 26th 4:30pm
“Shakespeare for Kids” a play featuring live actors presented by Hampstead Theatre Company takes place on Monday, April 26, 2010 at 4:30pm in the Robin Bush Room. Audience participation is encouraged. Lots of fun is sure to ensue while children learn about some of Shakespeare’s most famous plays!  Recommended for children 6 and up.
 

Love Poems For Valentine's Day: Guaranteed To Throw Sparks Or Your Money Back.

Photo Credit: aliança by Rodrigo GianesiFor some people Valentine's Day is easy. They sow Necco Sweethearts like grass seed, believing each little saying imprinted on each little pastel-tinted heart to be meaningful if not oracular. Then there are the conspiracy theorists who claim to have documented proof that the Truffle Makers' Guild and the equally nefarious Greeting Card Poets' Bund are behind the whole charade.

And then there are the rest of us, swinging between hope and despair.

On Influence, Influenza and Outright Thievery

Photo Credit: Glad Day for Surfin,' after William "Hodad" Blake by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com Lately, I have been thinking a lot about this aphorism. It seems to have as many originators as it does permutations. The gist of it is, “good writers borrow; great writers steal.”

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