Space

Book Hunters in Brief #82: Pluto!

Pluto was my favorite planet even before it was demoted to a planetoid by some heartless poindexter with an ax to grind. I mean, the ninth planet always seemed like my kind of place: cold and dark, with very little in the way of tourism and telemarketing. The fact that it is by all accounts completely devoid of Kardashians is, for me, just icing on that little ball of ice. Pluto's downgrade just solidified my affections. It's not often a person like me can relate to a heavenly body of any sort, but when Pluto was kicked off the team because it was too small, too slow, and not good-looking enough. I, like a lot of people, knew exactly how it felt.

The Sky is Falling!

Maybe.... In the early hours of May 24, a comet stream will pass through our atmosphere. This one was discovered only ten years ago and there is no previous data to predict what might happen. Some say this comet will fizzle. Others say it might create a spectacular display brighter than the Perseid meteor showers. We'll have a front row seat in North America if it materializes. The potential show will be brightest between 1 AM and 3 AM.

Before then, brush up on your comet knowledge with these books:

Pale Blue Dot

Few words are needed for this video, it's just a great reminder that we're all in this together.  Carl Sagan commissioned the "Pale Blue Dot" photo from NASA in 1990.  Voyager 1, having just completed its primary mission and on its way out of the solar system, was turned around to photograph the Earth.  At the time, Voyager 1 was approximately 3.7 billion miles away.
 

Otaku Files: Giddy Up Space Cowboys!

 

 
The other day, I found myself intentionally distracted by the late night television block on Cartoon Network entitled Adult Swim. If you haven't caught on to this craze yet, tune in to Cartoon Network at around 9PM every night of the week. Here's the schedule site: Adult Swim Schedule. Kids, ask your parents.


Apollo 11 Anniversary

This week marks the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. Were you watching it live as the images were beamed back to Earth on July 20, 1969? Maybe you have never seen the original broadcast.  If you would like to see it again, or for the first time, you can now view NASA’s restored clips of the transmission online.  

If you're curious to know more about the Apollo 11 mission, check out these titles from the HCPL catalog:

Syndicate content