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Hanukkah
Submitted by: Elizabeth Hunt, Freeman
Audience
• Toddler • Pre-school
Books
Hanukkah Haiku by:Harriet Ziefert
There's one haiku for each night, and shortened pages add one candle to the menorah every time the page is turned. Whimsical illustrations done with saturated colors add to the charm of each poem.
I have a Little Dreidel by:Maxie Baum
An illustrated retelling of the classic Hanukkah song, with directions for playing the dreidel game and a recipe for making latkes.
Hanukkah, Oh Hanukkah by:Susan L. Roth
A family of mice celebrates the eight days of Hanukkah with friends in this illustrated version of the holiday song.
"My Dreidel" in Chalk in Hand by:Phyllis Noe Pflomm
A quick draw and tell story using shapes to create a dreidel. (good lead in to craft)
Songs
Dreidel Song
I have a little dreidel
I made it out of clay
And when it's dry and ready
Then dreidel I shall play
CHORUS
Oh dreidel dreidel dreidel
I made it out of clay
And when it's dry and ready
Then dreidel I shall play

It has a lovely body
With legs so short and thin
And when it is so tired
It drops and then I win!
CHORUS
My dreidel's always playful
It loves to dance and spin
A happy game of dreidel
Come play now, let's begin!
CHORUS
Twinkle Twinkle Hanukkah Lights
Tune: Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Twinkle, twinkle Hanukkah lights,
Shining brightly for 8 nights,
See the dreidel spin around,
Eat some latke crisp and brown.
Twinkle, twinkle Hanukkah lights,
Shining brightly for 8 nights
Five Little Latkes Chant
Five little latkes sizzling in a pan (hold up 5 fingers)
One went pop (clap hands)
And then it went bam (slap legs)
4, 3, 2, 1 little latke(s) sizzling in a pan…
Light the Candles Bright
(Tune: Farmer in the Dell)

Oh, light the candles bright,
And dance around the light.
Heigh-ho the derry-oh,
It's Hanukkah tonight.

Spin the dreidel round,
And watch it falling down.
Heigh-ho the derry-oh,
It's Hanukkah tonight.

Latke treats to eat,
And family to greet.
Heigh-ho the derry-oh,
It's Hanukkah tonight.
Hanukkah is Coming Very Soon
Tune: I’m a Little Teapot

Hanukkah is coming very soon
I hope they’ll be some presents, too
Here is the menorah
Light the lights
There is one for every night
(count to eight)
All Around the World
Tune: Here We Go ‘round the Mulberry Bush

This is the way we wake up early (stretch)
Wake up early
Wake up early
This is the way we wake up early
All around the world

This is the way we eat our breakfast… (pretend to eat cereal)
This is the way we run and play… (run in place)
This is the way we wave good-bye… (wave)
This is the way we go to sleep… (pretend to sleep)
Skinamarink
Skinnamarinky dinky dink
Skinnamarinky do,
I love you!

Skinnamarinky dinky dink
Skinnamarinky do,
I love you!

I love you in the morning,
And in the afternoon
I love you in the evening,
Underneath the moon…

Skinnamarinky dinky dink
Skinnamarinky do,
I love you!
Craft
Dreidel Shape

Give children a square, a triangle and a small rectangle. Ask them to glue them in the shape of a dreidel. Make a sticker with the gimmel (win all) letter to stick on the square of the dreidel.
Notes
From Wikipedia accessed 11/23/11: "Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BCE. Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar.

The festival is observed by the kindling of the lights of a unique candelabrum, the nine-branched Menorah or Hanukiah, one additional light on each night of the holiday, progressing to eight on the final night. The typical Menorah consists of eight branches with an additional raised branch. The extra light is called a shamash (Hebrew: ùîù, "attendant" or "sexton")[1] and is given a distinct location, usually above or below the rest. The purpose of the shamash is to have a light available for use, as using the Hanukkah lights themselves is forbidden."