STARTING SHAKESPEARE

(FREE BEAR INCLUDED IN EACH BOOK)

Happy Birthday Will

 

The boy, the bear, the baron, the bard    The Boy, the Bear, the Baron, the Bard / Gregory Rogers
In modern London a boy kicks a soccer ball into an abandoned theater, when he goes in to get it he discovers a room full of costumes. He tries a few on and then starts to kick his ball around inside. But when he kicks it through the stage curtains and runs after it he finds himself on the stage of the Globe four centuries earlier and just before the start of a performance. A furious playwright and producer chases him off the stage and out of the theater, and a grand chase begins.


William Shakespeare and the Globe      William Shakespeare & the Globe / Aliki

This is a short colorful survey of the playwright’s life, the first two Globe theaters, and the reconstruction of the theater at the end of the twentieth century, in which we learn why the Globe and other theaters are round and why there are bears close by.
Contents: Act one: Childhood -- Act two: London -- Queen -- Theatre -- Act three: Company and rivals -- Plague and poems -- Dismantling -- Act four: Globe -- Stratford again -- Fire -- Changing times -- Good-bye, Will -- Act five: Hello, Sam -- Uncovering -- Building -- Sam's globe -- Shakespeare's works -- Chronology -- Words and expressions -- Sites to visit.


Stage Fright on a Summer Night      Stage Fright on a Summer Night / by Mary Pope Osborne
(Magic tree house ; 25)
Librarian Morgan le Fay sends Jack and Annie to London in 1600 in time to sample the afternoon’s odors and entertainments across London Bridge where they discover the Bear Garden and then the Globe, where they are recruited to fill in for two missing actors as fairies in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Jack battles stage fright, but Annie does her part “with lots of feeling: 
     You spotted snakes, with double tongue,
     Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen:

Annie waved her hand as if shooing away the snakes and hedgehogs.
     Newts and blind worms, do no wrong;
     Come not near out Fairy Queen…”

This time, at the instance of Jack and Annie, it’s the bard that saves the bear.