Eat, play and read like an Aztec

Huexotzinco Codex, 1531Did you know that Tenochtitlan, the capital of the Aztec empire (where Mexico City is now), was larger than most large European cities when the Spanish arrived?  That more than a million people in Mexico today speak a dialect of Nahuatl, the language spoken in the empire? Join us for an Hispanic Heritage Month program on Wednesday, October 12 from 6 to 7 p.m. with some activities common to everyday Aztec life. Decipher some pictographs created in 1531, play a game of patolli or ulama, enjoy food that Aztecs would have eaten, and more. 

Book "Bag" Sale

The Friends of the Parker Williams Branch Library will be having their last book sale for 2011 on Saturday, Sept. 24th, from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.  This will be a book “bag” sale.  Come and fill up a plastic bag with books for just $3.00, or fill up a paper bag with books for just $6.00.  There will be hundreds of paperbacks and hardbacks to choose from.  Bags will be furnished by the Friends.

Other items for sale include CD’s, DVD’s, cassettes, and VHS.

The book sale will be held in the large meeting room located by the County Clerk's office.

Join discussion of One Amazing Thing

Just us for a discussion of One Amazing Thing by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni on Wednesday, September 28 from 11 a.m.

Storytime Fun

Once upon a timeSummer's done and the kids are back in school, but the library still has fun planned for the little ones.  The Parker Williams Branch Library offers two storytimes every week, year-round.  On Wednesdays there's Preschool Storytime at 10:30am.  This program is for children ages 3-6.  We read stories, sing songs, and make a simple craft.  On Thursdays there's Toddler Time.  This program is intended for babies and toddlers under 3 years old.  We read short stories, sing songs, play with the parachute, and blow bubbles.

2011 ReaderNation Winner

Milissa MIller won a $50.00 Amazon gift card for participating in the Adult Summer Reading Program at the Parker Williams Branch Library.  Ms. Miller noticed there was a summer reading program for adults on the library's web page. Since her daughter was participating in the program for children,  Ms. Miller felt she could set a good example and encourage her daughter by also participating.