Books & Media

Cooking, the Graphic Novel

Food Anatomy by Julia RothmanIf a cookbook could be made into a graphic novel, it would look something like Food Anatomy: the Curious Parts & Pieces of our Edible World by Julia Rothman. It's part food encyclopedia, part cooking lessons, and all easy on the eyes. The first thing I learned: the difference between New York, New Jersey, Chicago, St. Louis, and Detroit styles of pizza. My next lesson will be how to make cheese.  

Colson Whitehead wins the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Colson Whitehead's bestseller and Oprah Book Club pick, The Underground Railroad, has won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.The Pulitzer committee lauded Railroad "for a smart melding of realism and allegory that combines the violence of slavery and the drama of escape in a myth that speaks to contemporary America."

Women's History Month: Female Directors

kathryn bigelowIn 2009, Kathryn Bigelow made history by becoming the first woman to win an Academy Award for Best Director. She won for her film The Hurt Locker, about an army bomb squad unit during the Iraq War. Since her win in 2009, no woman has received a Best Director nomination. In fact, in the history of the Academy Awards, only three other women received nominations for Best Director: Lina Wertmuller for Seven Beauties in 1976, Jane Campion for The Piano in 1993, and Sofia Coppola for Lost in Translation in 2003.

Although this minimalistic showing of women in the Best Director category does present, women’s involvement in the film industry as directors is not quite as dire as the Academy Awards would suggest. For years, women have fought to hold as strong a presence behind the camera as they have had in front of it. They have directed cult classics and blockbusters, genre-setters and award winners, visual masterpieces and character-driven films. In short, women have been breaking down barriers in film as they have in every other profession, and they will continue to do so until there are no barriers left. 

Women’s History Month (celebrated annually each March) may be coming to a close, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy an excellent movie ably directed by a woman. Below, I have listed just a few of the women working in the field, along with some of their most well-known films. Check out the list to see a fraction of what women have contributed to film over the years.

Moving Pictures

We’ve all done it.  At one time or another, we’ve had to pack up and move.  No matter what situation or location we’re moving to, it can be a stressful time.  And not just the packing and moving part.  There’s always the question of adjusting to a new place and new people and maybe an entirely new job.  Whether across town or across the country or even another part of the world, a move is exciting and frightening and invigorating and frustrating – all at once.

Going to Grandma's House

Where We Lived by Jack LarkinJust added a book to my "to read" list: Where We Lived: Discovering the Places We Once Called Home by Jack Larkin. With photos and drawings, you get a history of how we've lived in America since the country was formed. For genealogists and social historians, how cool!