Books

SF Books People Claim to have Read

Today, io9 wrote a blog about "10 Books you Pretend to Have Read." Looking over the list, I realized that, while I've not pretended to read books that I have not actually read, there were several books out there I do need to read.  Lists like this are a good way to grasp the history of the genre, see what has changed, and what ideas we are still exploring.

Book Hunters in Brief #84: Emotions

One of the more troublesome things about being a youngster is that you have all the same feelings that grown-ups do, but you don't have names for them yet. Sure, you figure out happy and angry pretty early on. It's some of the others--envy, anxiety, aggravation, desire--to name just a few that give one fits. They're all valid human reactions to the world, but they are hard even for adults to identify when experiencing them.

West University Book Group-September 2

sixth extinctionPlease join us to discuss Pulitzer Prize winner, The Sixth Extinction, by Elizabeth Kolbert.  

Wednesday September 2, 2015, at  11 a.m.

"Arresting . . . Ms. Kolbert shows in these pages that she can write with elegiac poetry about the vanishing creatures of this planet, but the real power of her book resides in the hard science and historical context she delivers here, documenting the mounting losses that human beings are leaving in their wake."  New York TImes review

Unmask!: graphic novels for teens

In conjunction with this year's Teen Summer Reading Program, Unmask!, this blog post is dedicated to graphic novels with hero themes suitable for teens. 

Read one or read all and don't forget reading a graphic novel is one of the challenges of our Hero Quest

History Lovers' Book Club

Magnolia City

 

A city where no dream is too big…

Join us at Baldwin Boettcher on Friday, August 21, 2 pm, for a discussion of Magnolia City, by Duncan W. Alderson.  Copies are available at the library.

Book Hunters in Brief #83: Tiny Heroes

Heroes come in as many shapes and sizes as there are reasons that they are heroic. This week, Book Hunters want to celebrate the tiniest of the heroes with these reading recommendations for the younger folks (and younger at heart) in our audience.

What I've Read This Summer

This summer has included a lot of traveling for one reason or another. As I sat in airports or in the passenger seat of the family car, I caught up on my reading. Here's what I've read so far:

Nine Dragons 


cover of Nine Dragons

212


cover of 212

 

Spring Branch-Memorial Library--The Page Turners

In falling snowTitle to be discussed: In falling snow by Mary-Rose MacColl.  Date of meeting: Tuesday, August 11, 6:30 pm.  Summary: "Traveling to France during World War I to bring home her fifteen-year-old brother, who ran away to enlist, Iris, a young Australian nurse, decides to stay in Paris to help establish a field hospital staffed entirely by women."

E.L. Doctorow, 1931 - 2015

I’m afraid I owe E.L. Doctorow better than I will be able to muster here. You see his novel Ragtime was the first grown up book I ever read. It was 1976, I was twelve years old and visiting my grandparents for the summer. They had rented a cabin on Grand Lake near Alpena, Michigan. One afternoon when the adults were napping—resting up from their early morning fishing—and I had had my fill of swimming, I rummaged through the left-behind-by-renters books of the lodge’s meager library. The book was, as I recall, the only one there that neither dealt with the best ways to catch the biggest fish, nor having a picture of a muscular, bare-chested hunk and a swooning damsel on the cover. Doctorow did something that day for which I will always be indebted to him. He showed me that books written for adults were not necessarily like adults themselves: dull, prone to long, confusing lectures and all but inscrutable. This book moved.

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