Books

There's No Word for That

Lost in TranslationDo the Eskimos really have over 60 words to describe snow?  I don't know, but after reading Lost in Translation by Ella Frances Sanders, I know that there’s a Finnish word for the distance a reindeer can travel before needing to rest.  And a Japanese word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees.  See what words you find.

Book Hunters in Brief #72: Happy Birthday, Orson!

The mass market wine ads and way too many appearances on the Tonight Show aside (not to mention the famously prodigious appetites and the girth to go with them), Orson Welles was not the peaked-by-thirty, riding-on-his-younger self's-coattails punch line that many seem to remember him as these days.

Or maybe he was...

Johannes Cabal the Necromancer

Johannes Cabal is not a happy customer. A year after selling his soul to a demon for the secrets of Life and Death, he discovers living without it isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. So he does the only thing any sensible customer would do in such a situation: demand to see the manager. There’s no return policy for souls in Hell, but Satan is prepared to cut Johannes a deal: he can have his own soul back in exchange for the souls of 100 others. He has one year.

Ready for The Avengers?

As you gear yourself for the release of The Avengers 2: Age of Ultron this weekend, try these graphic novels to tide you over.

History Lovers' Book Club

China Dolls

 

China Dolls is our Asian Pacific American Heritage Month selection.

Book Hunters in Brief #71: Jazz Appreciation Month

From the 1920s well into the 1950s, the soundtrack of life in this country was jazz in various forms, and why not? The American Century needed its distinctly American music, and jazz is just that. Its deepest and strongest roots may be in Africa, but it was the intertwining of those roots with European traditions that made jazz what it is. It is the music of the "Melting Pot." For every Armstrong and Ellington there was a Beiderbecke and Goodman. To say jazz is "as American as Apple Pie" is to undersell its American-ness. It could not have come to be anywhere else.

Spring Branch-Memorial Library--The Page Turners

Defending JacobTitle to be discussed: Defending Jacob by William Landay.  Date of meeting: Tuesday, May 12, 6:30 pm.  Summary: "Andy Barber has been an assistant district attorney in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than twenty years. When a shocking crime shatters his New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: his fourteen-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student. As the crisis reveals how little a father knows about his son, Andy will face a trial of his own--between loyalty and justice, between truth and allegation, between a past he's tried to bury and a future he cannot conceive."

New Adult Fiction

I just finished a new adult book called Best Kind of Broken by Chelsea Fine.  What is new adult you ask?  The somewhat controversial “n

Book Hunters in Brief #70: National Library Week

This year, National Library Week's theme is "Unlimited Possibilities @ Your Library," Now, let's face it, most of these National [Insert noun here] Weeks overstate by half the importance of the thing they celebrate--yes, oatmeal is an important part of a balanced breakfast, but the fact is that you could replace it with any number of cereal grains and life would go on, more or less, unchanged. That is not the case with our nation's public libraries.

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