Books

Spring Branch-Memorial Library: The Page Turners

Tea girlTitle to be discussed: The tea girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See.  Date of meeting: May 8, 6:30 p.m.  Summary: "Li-yan and her family align their lives around the seasons and the farming of tea. Then one day a stranger arrives in the village. Li-yan translates for the stranger and is among the first to reject the rules that have shaped her existence. When she has a baby outside of wedlock, rather than stand by tradition, she wraps her daughter in a blanket, with a tea cake hidden in her swaddling, and abandons her in the nearest city."

Financial Literacy

piggy bankI know, I know...financial literacy. Not the most exciting of topics I agree, but it is a worthwhile one. It's also Houston Money Week, an initiative designed to provide individuals and familes with financial knowledge.

Crosby Book Club Meets Friday, April 20 @ 2 pm

Crosby Book Club will meet on Friday, April 20 at 2 pm in the meeting room.  We will discuss The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit, by Michael Finkel.  This is the true account of Christopher Knight, who so preferred solitude to society, he lived alone in the Maine woods for nearly three decades, sleeping in a tent, and conversing with no one.  How did Knight survive the bitterly cold winters, isolated and undetected, for so long?  And why would he choose this extreme lifestyle in the first place?

This adult program is free and open to the public.  Join us!

      

Blackout Poetry

blackout poetryCelebrate National Poetry Month by creating blackout poetry. No, it doesn't require writing in the dark, in fact, it doesn't require writing at all. All you need are a few pages of text (typically from an old book, magazine, or newspaper) and a black marker. Simply blackout all of the words you want to hide, and voilà, the visible words that remain create a blackout poem. View a gallery of blackout poetry from the simple to the sublime from @makeblackoutpoetry via Instagram.

Want to try your hand at blackout poetry? Stop by the 1st floor reference desk in April and we'll provide supplies to help you get started.

Literary Siblings

bronte sisters image from wikipedia

Celebrate National Siblings Day with a collection of famous (and not so famous) literary siblings. From real-life sibling authors, Charlotte and Emily Bronte, to fictional siblings, the Baudelaire trio of a A Series of Unfortunate Events. 

Fictional Siblings

• The Famous Five from Enid Blyton
• The Baudelaires from a Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket
• The March sisters from Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
• The Bennet sisters from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Rhythm and Rhyme-Poetry to Make You Move

It's April once again which means baseball, rain showers, left-over Easter candy and yes, poetry. That's right it's National Poetry Month and while, sure, you could read some Keats or Frost or maybe even some Shakespeare, but I’m thinking a little younger-and a lot more active.

Graphic Novel Book Club

If you like comics and graphic novels then you won't want to miss out on the book club starting at South Houston Branch Library in April. Tweens ages 8 to 13 are invited to join our Tween Graphic Novel Club, where we will discuss and take part in fun activities related to different Graphic Novel titles. This is a three session program that starts on Thursday, April 5 at 5:00 PM. Space is limited and registration is required. Please call the library at 832-927-5530 to sign up.

Mysteries by Way of India

mysteries by way of indiaLooking for more titles similiar to this month's I Love a Mystery Book Club selection, The Rising Man, by Abir Mukherjee? Check out our shortlist of Mysteries by Way of India including, books, eBooks, and movies.

I Love a Mystery Book Club
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
12:00pm, LRNC 131

Spring Branch-Memorial Library--The Page Turners

Small great thingsTitle to be discussed: Small great things by Jodi Picoult.  Date of meeting: Tuesday, April 9, 2018.  Summary: Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse.  During her shift, she begins a routine checkup on a newborn, but the parents, who are white supremacists, don't want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery.  Ruth hesitates and, when tragedy strikes, is charged with a serious crime. Kennedy McQuarrie, a white public defender, takes her case but insists that mentioning race in the courtroom is not a winning strategy. As the trial moves forward, Ruth and Kennedy must gain each other's trust, and come to see that what they've been taught their whole lives about others and themselves might be wrong.

Syndicate content