Fiction

PRIZES FOR ADULT READERS

ReaderNation

Have you registered for ReaderNation yet?  This is Harris County Library's Summer Reading Program for adults, and it's not too late to sign up!  Registration closes at midnight on August 8, 2009.  Once you're registered, read and log 4 books in order to be eligible for great prizes from amazon.com.  

  • 1st prize $200 gift card 
  • 2nd prize $150 gift card
  • 3rd prize $100 gift card 

Each branch library will also select a winner from a random drawing of iReaders completing the program. The prize will be a $50.00 gift card, and the drawing will take place on or about August 17th. 

Books for the Beach

Are you planning a trip to the beach and looking for something to read?  Take some inspiration from NPR.  NPR asked their book-loving listeners to pick their best beach reads in a Best Beach Books Ever poll.  The top pick, not surprisingly, is the Harry Potter series.  The top five books are:

I'M A LITTLE TEAPOT

Does anyone else have as much trouble as I do, sticking with a series?  I don't know if it's because I'm easily bored, have a teeny tiny attention span, or if I'm just not acquainted with those that are well written (suggestions welcome).  For some reason I'm predisposed to pass on books if they're in a series.  Maybe I've seen one too many movies where the sequel and sequel's sequel are promoted and marketed and touted until I'm all steamed up and then I see the sequel and it's never as good as the original and I could just whistle Dixie.  

On the Shelf: Shelter Me

In her beautifully written first novel, Shelter Me, Juliette Fay invites us to accompany Janie LaMarche, undone by grief and anger following her young husband’s death, on a journey to hopefully-ever-after.

Her mourning disrupted by a builder contracted to add a porch to her house - her husband’s last gift to her – Janie begins to see a future filled with new and unexpected possibilities, if only she can find a way to let go of her sorrow.

Shelter Me is one of the best books I

Taboo breaking author passes away

As I was driving in, NPR announced that E. Lynn Harris, prominent African American author, had passed away. He was known for his ground breaking novels depicting black gay men, and he'll be missed by many. You may want to read his memoir, What Becomes of the Brokenhearted.

What Becomes of the Brokenhearted Just Too Good to Be True Just As I Am

This Book's For You

Ah, Summer....for most of us, summer is the time to take some much deserved R & R.  Because of the economy though, Americans are scaling back on eating out, vacations, and luxury items.  What to do?  Some are consoling themselves with beer.  A report by Information Resources says that beer sales are up 5.6 percent this year.  Craft beers and discount brews are doing especially well.  

The Bat-Man and his Ancestors

When writer Bill Finger met artist Bob Kane at a party in 1938 he realized that he’d met a kindred spirit.  Both young men were anxious to succeed in the new publishing enterprise that was blossoming in New York at the time: comic books!  Just that year two other young men, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, had sold an idea they’d thought up in their teens to National Publications.  It was their comic strip about an extremely physically fit extraterrestrial good guy.  Superman became a publishing phenomenon, exceeding sales expectations almost faster than a speeding bullet, and National Publication wanted more. 

Bob Kane had the idea for another costumed superhero, as the genre woul

THE ART OF APPRECIATION

I really appreciate a book that can intrigue me from page 1. That is so delicious! Other books are like eating dry bread; they seem bland and unsatisfying and I don't know why I continue reading. I'm hungry for something sweet, something to captivate me, entertain me, delight me, right away. So Susan Vreeland almost lost me as she painstakingly assembled her cast of characters for 

On the shelf: Blue Plate Special

One of the things I enjoy most about working at the Kingwood Branch Library is finding a new-to-me book and author. One recent discovery was Blue Plate Special: A Novel of Love, Loss and Food by Frances Norris. I was drawn to the book by the cover art and the back-cover copy by Elinor Lipman, one of my favorite authors, and I was not disappointed.

But What Happens to the Dog?

Ever since a childhood trauma involving a sobbing fit in the lobby of the Malco Theatre after viewing the climactic scene of Old Yeller, I have never been able to finish a book or a movie that featured the death of a beloved pet.  Many times, I have been lulled into a false feeling of security, only to be mentally cast back to that empty theatre lobby.  I don't want to produce any major spoilers, but who remembers The Yearling?  What about

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