Fiction

Spooky Tales for Teens and Adults

We’re into the heart of October now, and while next week we’ll have some not so spooky options for the younger crowd,  it’s now time to get to the truly spooky stuff—the books that will get your heart racing, palms sweating and mind whirring. I’ve got eight books for teens and eight for adults here, all terrifyingly creepy in their own way. From zombies to ghosts to monsters that go bump in the night, to the scariest thing of all: humanity, these recommendations are not for the faint of heart. Might want to sleep with a light on after these. 

 

 

Gothic Literature

It’s my favorite time of year, folks. Those October through December days are here and I, for one, am ready to kick it off with the creepy, spooky, and kooky month that’s full of tricks, treats and scarily good books to read. For this blog entry I want to take it back—back to the beginning of horror, back to 1764 with the introduction of the Gothic Novel. Gothic tales blend horror and romance, featuring large, crumbling architecture, isolated heroes, a villain who has fallen from grace, supernatural elements and a dark, foreboding sense of dread. Awesome, right?

Wonderfully Wordless

Picture books can represent many things to many people: an introduction to reading, a portal to a different world, a bringer of nostalgia or simply a happy place. No matter what, when you crack open a picture book you're sucked into a different world-- one filled with raining meatballs, typing cows, dinosaurs going to bed and so many other amazing, heart warming, laugh out loud, creative journeys. And sometimes, those worlds are just shown to us, without any words at all, allowing each reader to create their own story, their own world, their own adventure. Here are 9 worldess picture books, just waiting to be opened and explored. 

 

 

What We're Reading

The librarians at the Evelyn Meador Branch Library read A LOT of books! I’m sure that comes as no surprise to you. Today, we decided to share some of what we are reading. This might even help you know who to ask for the next time you need a book recommendation.

Sweet Reads

Some days, we just want something sweet. Something delicious, easy to swallow and oh-so-good; something fulfilling in the best possible way. Well, it’s not always in ones best interest to have said sweet things just sitting around all the time, ready to be devoured. Sometimes, one must get their sweet fix somewhere else. For the sake of today’s blog, I’m suggesting: books. Books of all flavors and centers, but all with a bit of sweetness in their title. 

 

Escape the 80's

If you could pick any decade and experience it for the first time (or all over again) what would it be? Well, if your first thought was the 80’s (the one with John Hughes, big hair and shoulder pads, obviously) then you’re in luck. On Wednesday, July 25th, if you’re in grades 6-12, join us for a totally tubular escape room event where you will form teams and attempt to find clues, solve puzzles and open all of the locks before time runs out. You’ll have 45 minutes to finish, but be warned, if you can’t find your way home again you’ll be stuck in the 80’s forever.

The Dog Days of Summer

It’s hot out there folks. It’s the type of heat that makes you want to stay inside and not do much of anything at all, except maybe read a good book. Read a good book while sitting next to a fan, with the A/C on full blast, with a glass of iced tea next to you. Apparently, as I found out during my quick internet search before writing this blog, the term ‘dog days of summer’ can’t actually be used during any ole’ month, no matter how hot it is. The idiom is supposed to be used during the period of time when Sirius, the Dog Star and the brightest visible star from any part of Earth, rises at the same time as the sun: usually somewhere between July 3rd to August 11th.

I don't remember the title BUT...

We’ve all been there, right? You’re wandering the aisles when you see a book you think is interesting but you don’t bring it home and you forget to write down the title or take a picture to help you remember. Now, all you can recall is some vague shapes and random not-quite-right words but the cover-oh the cover was BLUE. Only a few lucky ones will discover their lost book again but hey, if I can help you out I will. That being said, here are some books, separated by children’s, young adult, and adult that are not just really excellent reads but, you guessed it, all happen to share one particular, memorable color on their covers.  

 

 

A Novel Idea: JUNE BOOK REVEAL! @High Meadows Branch Library

june book clubWe are happy to reveal that our June Book Club selection is Shari Lapeña’s The Couple Next Door.

Anne and Marco Conti seem to have it all-a loving relationship, a wonderful home, and their beautiful baby, Cora. One hot summer night they are invited to a dinner party next door, and a terrible crime is committed. Suspicion immediately focuses on the parents, but the truth is a much more complicated story. Inside the Conti's house, an unsettling account of what actually happened unfolds. Detective Rasbach knows that the panicked couple is hiding something. Both Anne and Marco soon discover that the other is keeping secrets they’ve kept for years. What follows is the nerve-racking unraveling of a family-a chilling tale of deception, duplicity, and unfaithfulness.

Mental Health and Teens

May is Mental Health Awareness month, started in 1949 in order to raise awareness and educate the public about mental health, what it’s like to live with these conditions and strategies for getting help. Talking about mental health can be scary; there's a stigma around it that makes people want to shy away from the subject, but here's the thing: it's important. One way that stigma can be erased is by representation. We all want to see ourselves in the books we read, and some authors have worked hard to create compelling, rich characters that happen to suffer from mental illness. From depression, to schizophrenia, anxiety, bi-polar disorder, agoraphobia and more, here are thier stories:
 

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