Nonfiction

Book Hunters in Brief #138: The Olympics

This week, Book Hunters in Brief, along with the rest of the world, turns its attention to Rio and the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Library Superheros

The Bad-Ass Librarians of TimbuktuI am a librarian, so I feel duty-bound to read any book with a title like: The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts. Joshua Hammer has penned the story of the city's librarians who smuggled their rare manuscripts to safety through war-torn Al Quaeda territory. I wonder if they wore capes.... 

Book Hunters in Brief #135: On the Campaign Trail

For the life of me, I cannot figure out why anyone would want to be president. Sure, even if you do a lousy job (maybe especially if you do a lousy job) you get your picture in the history books.

Still, If you think about it, it's really just a glorified temp job and the whole country is your janus-headed supervisor.

You say, "But you get to be leader of the free world!" I say "leader" is probably too strong a term. At best you're a cat-herder and half of the cats aren't going to do what you say no matter what just because you vote blue and they vote red or vice versa.

Who needs that kind of aggravation?

Our Future World

You jump in your automated car to pick up some prescription medicine tailored to your DNA. While you're waiting at the store, a space tourism brochure pops into your VR headset. Once the personalized medicine is ready, you ask your automated car to pull up the navigation route for a popular restaurant where the 3D printer at the table will create your appetizer before the main course arrives. Is this the year 2041? Maybe. Maybe not.

Predicting the future is a tricky endeavor. Even so, some authors have attempted the feat. Read about their thoughts in these books and see if you agree with their future forecasts.

 

Big Stories Told Small

Authors often write about expansive topics and big ideas in their books. Sometimes, though, they choose to write about smaller subjects that impact us all the same. Try a few of these microhistory books on topics you probably haven't thought much about - until now:

Know Thy Generation, and Everyone Else's Too

Sticking Points by Hadyn ShawEvery generation brings new ideas and preferences to the mix. And every new generation is looked on suspiciously by the previous ones - at first. Whether you're a Traditionalist, a Baby Boomer, a Gen Xer, or a Millennial, you've been misunderstood and had to fight for what you want the world to be. When it comes to the workplace, that can get sticky. If you're a manager, you'll want to read Sticking Points: How to Get 4 Generations Working Together in the 12 Places They Come Apart by Hadyn Shaw. 

Book Hunters in Brief #126: Murder on the Beach

There's something about stories of trouble in paradise that strike a particularly resonant chord with humans--Judaism and Christianity are far from the only religions that begin with a fall from an earthly Eden. Why? Beats me, but its something for us all to ponder this summer as we lay on a beach with a tall frosty one beside us and the sand between our toes. Book Hunters has a few suggestions to fill your beach bag with.

Palm Beach Nasty by Tom Turner

Origami to Calm You

World's Best Origami by Nick RobinsonThe latest craze in adult coloring books is a great way to slow down, calm yourself, and use your creative side. There's another activity that does the same thing: origami. It's not just for kids. Click here for books to get you started. And be on the lookout for a great book coming this fall: Origami Chic by Sok Song. 

Book Hunters in Brief #123: Books for Fans of Beyoncé's Lemonade

This week Book Hunters, like nearly everyone else with ears and even the least bit of cultural awareness, were abuzz with talk of Beyonce's Lemonade. So today, we offer a selection of books inspired in one way or another by the album.

Slip on the beats, see what you think.

Book Hunters in Brief #121: Libraries Transform

Whoever came up with "libraries transform" as the American Library Association's theme for National Library Week 2016 deserves a raise. It is one on those rare things: a sentence in its simplest possible form--a noun, a verb and that's it--that communicates complex ideas.

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