Poetry

Calling All Teen Poets, Rappers & Writers! Space City Poetry Slam! Saturday @ Barbara Bush Branch Library

Teen poets, writers and rappers! It’s time to step up and stand out at the WITS Space City Slam, Saturday, March 7, 2:00 PM at Barbara Bush Branch Library.

The slam is free and open to all teens between 13 and 19 years. No registration is necessary. Just bring your best poetry and bring it at the mic.

Saturday's event is the third of ten first-round slams to held across the Greater Houston Area. Saturday's winners  will move on to the semifinal round to compete for a spot in the final Space City Grand Slam in April at Discovery Green. The six winners of the Grand Slam will join the Meta-Four Houston performance poetry team at the Brave New Voices Festival this July in Atlanta.

Phillip Levine (1928 - 2015)

The poet Phillip Levine passed away on Sunday. The obituaries you may or may not read are going to focus on his reputation as a poet who wrote about the working class, or more accurately, about the actual work of those we lump under that term. And he was, no doubt, that. The title of one of his two National Book Award winning collections was after all What Work Is. And he should be lauded for that part of his work, but he was not only that. He was too smart, too multi-dimensional a human to be satisfied with that.

Celebrate African American History Month in Stanzas and Song

 

A poet’s connection to history is often palpable, whether they are speaking directly to the past or reaching out to us Lucille Clifton Plaque, "For Cornelia" from some bygone era. Within American poetry, there is a rich tradition of African American voices speaking to both their personal histories and the larger historical narratives that have shaped their lives. A reader could explore African American history this month through the voices of Jazz Poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, or the Black Arts Movement, some of whom you’ll find on this list. I’ve added a couple newcomers and names that might be a little less familiar, too. Plus, there’s Tupac. All the makings of a good jumping off point to celebrate African American history this February. 

Rod McKuen (1933 - 2015)

For a certain, very narrow slice of the population (of which I count myself a part)--namely "serious" poets--the name Rod McKuen is the punch line of any number of jokes. These jokes are invariably told with a knowing sneer and a big dollop of condescension. You see, Rod McKuen, for a considerable stretch of the 1960s and 70s, was something most younger Americans cannot imagine: a well-known and well-paid poet. He managed to become rich and famous by writing very accessible poems--lots and lots of them. How accessible, you ask?

Resolution Check: Poetry Writing Guides

Photo of QuillChances are if you are a reader of poetry, you are a writer of poetry. If you’re like me and the whole writing thing has gone on a bit of a hiatus for AHEM almostthreeyears or so, your hypothetical list of goals for the New Year may have included flexing your writerly muscles more often. And if your January has gone like mine, it is possible you haven’t actually worked on those New Year’s goals at all. Thankfully, HCPL has an assortment of books to encourage and stir the muse within, whether you’re a certifiable bard or just a beginner looking for a place to start.

Say Goodbye to 2014 (...with New Poetry Titles!)

Fireworks2014 has come and gone, but not without leaving behind some new poetry to enjoy. Here we have a sampling from our catalog of titles published in the past year. Some are rooted in a specific historical context; many are situated among the flotsam and jetsam of our contemporary life. There are collections spanning the entire careers of seasoned poets, some writings are offered posthumously, and some are brought by names we might not yet recognize. All attempt to give their own interpretation of just what it means to live. I think we could all use a little profundity to kick start our New Year, yes? 

Genre Benders: Novels in Verse

Cover Art: Sharp Teeth by Toby BarlowNovels in verse, while currently trendy in Children’s and Young Adult lit, don’t often get published for an adult audience as there hasn’t been much demand for them in a couple of centuries. Making such a deliberately uncommon choice in form would lead us to assume the verse acts as a crucial vessel, necessary for facilitating whatever story is being told. Compiled below are a sampling of verse novels published in the last few years. From the life of Shakespeare’s ghost writer to a lycanthrope-invaded L.A., there may be something on the list that interests you. I dare you to read one. Let’s find out if the genre can make a comeback. 

Mark Strand (1934 - 2014)

Cover Art: Almost Invisible by Mark Strand

Pulitzer Award-winning poet Mark Strand passed away this weekend after 80 years of life. Known to dwell on tropes of absence, death, and identity, his writings have both primed us for and will carry us through his departure. Though he has created art and criticism across several genres as a children’s book author, essayist, translator, and collage artist, he will be best remembered for his sizeable and enduring contribution to contemporary American poetry.

Poet Spotlight: Louise Gluck -- 2014 National Book Award Winner!

Cover Art: Faithful and Virtuous NightThis year’s prestigious National Book Award has been awarded to Louise Gluck for her latest collection, Faithful and Virtuous Night. Last night’s award joins an already long list of accolades for Gluck including the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1985, the Pulitzer in 1993, and the Bollingen Prize in 2001. Her career as a published poet has spanned nearly half a century, and in 2003 she served as U.S. Poet Laureate. You can already find her name printed in most anthologies of contemporary American poetry, and her latest work promises evolution of thought and form while still encircling familiar themes of existentialism, renewal, and their relationship to art.

National Book Awards 2014: Poetry Edition

If you have been looking for a gateway into contemporary American poetry, the National Book Award finalists are not a terrible place to start. Five poets  acting as judges have declared these five books to be “the best” of all poetry collections published this year, with the winner being announced at the black tie awards ceremony next Wednesday evening, November 19th at 7pm. 

  • Cover Art: Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia RankineCover Art: Second Childhood by Fanny Howe
  • Cover Art: This Blue by Maureen N. McLaneCover Art: Faithful and Virtuous Night by Louise Gluck
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