Book Clubs

Read It & Eat It Book Club - Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Wed @ 4:30

Read It & Eat It Book Club-The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lackslacks
Join us for a lively discussion of "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot.

"Documents the story of how scientists took cells from an unsuspecting descendant of freed slaves and created a human cell line that has been kept alive indefinitely, enabling discoveries in such areas as cancer research, in-vitro fertilization, and gene mapping."

Event Type: Book Discussion
Age Group(s): Adults
Date: 2/22/2017
Start Time: 4:30 PM
End Time: 6:00 PM

Teen Book Club: The Graveyard Book

Our teen book club debuts on Wednesday, March 15 at 3:00 pm. We hope you’ll join us for conversation and camaraderie as we discuss this month’s selection and decide on future book choices.

This month we’re reading The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. Attend the tale of Nobody “Bod” Owens, who grew up in a graveyard, was raised by ghosts, and comes of age facing *ahem* grave peril. From ghosts to ghouls to attacks from the Jack, join Bod’s arcane adventures. Learn how, in the words of Audrey Niffenegger, “It takes a graveyard to raise a child."

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

 

Crosby Book Club meets Friday, February 17 @ 2 pm

In recognition of African-American History Month, Crosby Book Club will discuss Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi.  Homegoing begins with two half-sisters in Ghana, one of whom is sold into slavery, while the other becomes the wife of a British slaver. The book follows the women and their descendants on two continents and for over three hundred years of history. 

Please join us on Friday, February 17 at 2 pm in the meeting room.  New members are welcome!

The Secret Keeper

 The “A Novel Idea” book club meets the second Wednesday of every month at 11:00 am. On March 8 join us for discussion of The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton. Come join our reading rendezvous.

The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton

Spring Branch-Memorial Library--The Page Turners

Fair playTitle to be discussed: Fair play by Deeanne Gist.  Date of meeting: Tuesday, February 14, 6:30 p.m.  Summary: "'Fair play' is a historical love story about a lady doctor and a Texas Ranger who meet at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. Saddled with a man's name, the captivating Billy Jack Tate makes no apologies for taking on a man's profession. As a doctor at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, she is one step closer to having her very own medical practice--until Hunter Scott asks her to give it all up to become his wife.... He has no patience for big cities and women who think they belong anywhere but home.... Despite their difference of opinion, Hunter and Billy find a growing attraction between them--until Hunter discovers an abandoned baby. He and Billy team up to make sure this foundling isn't left in the slums of Chicago. As they fight for the underprivileged children in the Nineteenth Ward, an entire Playground Movement is birthed. But when the Fair comes to an end, one of them will have to give up their dream. Will Billy exchange her doctor's shingle for the domesticated role of a southern wife, or will Hunter abandon the wide open spaces of home for a life in the "gray city, " a woman who insists on being the wage earner, and a group of ragamuffins who need more than a playground for breathing space?"

Crosby Book Club meets Friday, January 20 @ 2 pm

Crosby Book Club will meet on Friday, January 20 at 2 pm to discuss The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde.  In his novel that scandalized Victorian Britain, Wilde writes, "There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book.  Books are well written, or badly written.  That is all."  Unfortunately, the courts did not agree with this aphorism, using The Picture of  Dorian Gray as evidence to convict the author for crimes of "gross indecency".  What was all the uproar about?  Ask for your copy of the book at the front desk, and find out!

Have Book - And They Turned it Into a Movie: Amazing Read Challenge Week 3

amazing read graphicThis week on the Amazing Read we challenge you to read a book that has been (or will be) turned into a movie!  For bonus points (not that we're keeping track) you could also watch the movie.  I always like to compare the two and see what they decided to change and which one I like better.  Spoiler alert: the book is (almost) always better.  I watched Warm Bodies, a zombie rom-com, over the weekend and I'm looking forward to reading the book this week.  We’d love to hear what you’re reading, so consider sharing with us through your Summer Reading Program log, by commenting on this post, or on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest.

In addition to the suggestions below, be sure to check out our Pinterest board: "Before They Were Movies."  Are we missing any of your favorites?

The Amazing Read: Summer Reading Challenge 2013

amazing readWelcome to Summer Reading 2013!  We're continuing our reading challenge this year, encouraging everyone to read a little outside of your comfort zone from week to week.  We'll post a topic each week to go along with our theme this year, Have Book, Will Travel, and ask you to respond by sharing your reading choices through your Summer Reading Program log, comments on the blog post, through Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest, or in conversation with family and friends.

This week's challenge is simple:  Have Book - Will Travel this Summer.  So, let's read something that has a summer theme.  It could be a beach read, a scary campfire story, a picture book about learning to swim, or a grilling cookbook.  This challenge is for all ages and all reading tastes.  I'm going to read Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury.  I've listed a few other suggestions for different ages below.  What are you reading?

Join a Book Club at HCPL

Photo Credit: Book Club by Robert Michalove via Flickr Creative Commons
For many people, one of the only things better than reading a good book is talking about a good book, which explains the continuing popularity of book clubs and discussion groups across the country. Yet, book clubs are much more than a place to gab about a ripping good yarn. They’re a chance to meet new people, explore new areas of interest, and get good tips on what to read next, and sometimes, book clubs are a good way to get yourself featured on Voice of America. This is exactly what happened recently to one of Harris County Public Library's many book groups. VOA featured our Tomball College & Community Library’s Paranormal Book Club in a story about the growing popularity among older readers of supernatural romances aimed at young adults (See video below).

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