Nonfiction

The Flood of Information - Whadda We Do with It?

Everydata by John JohnsonYou've probably felt it: we're bombarded today with information coming from every direction. Sometimes the sheer volume of information you're exposed to can make it hard to understand and make decisions based on it. There's a great eBook on this in our Hoopla eLibrary called Everydata: The Misinformation Hidden in the Little Data You Consume Every Day by John H. Johnson and Mike Gluck. (And checking out an eBook this year helps us reach our Project Mill-E goal of checking out one million eBooks and eAudiobooks in 2016. As of today, we're 81% there.) 

Book Hunters in Brief #142: Unusual Pet Memoirs

A show of hands. If you could give your pet the ability to talk, would you?

Remember this is the only being on earth who knows you eat ice cream straight out of the carton...

standing over the sink...

in your underwear...

for breakfast...

everyday...

and don't use a spoon.

Oh, and remember when you got so mad at Windows Vista, you threw your laptop across the room, then told everyone that the cat knocked it off your desk? Well, the cat knows what really happened, and probably isn't happy that you blamed your little temper tantrum on her.

Yeah. It's probably safer to do what these folks did, which is do the talking for your pet, or the writing as the case may be.

All Things Seinfeld

SeinfeldiaSay it with me now: "A Festivus for the rest of us", "These pretzels are making me thirsty", "Serenity now!". If any of these make sense to you, then you'll love a new book called Seinfeldia: How a Show about Nothing Changed Everything by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong. The print book has a waiting list, but you can download the audio with your library card from Hoopla.  

This October, Gulf Coast Reads The Train to Crystal City

October is just around the corner and for Harris County Public Library, and partner libraries, school districts,  universities and other organizations all over southeast Texas that means we are busy planning programs and booking presenters for Gulf Coast Reads 2016.

Now in its seventh year, Gulf Coast Reads is a reading initiative that encourages the reading and discussion of a selected title each October. It is meant to raise awareness of public libraries’ crucial role in building stronger, more connected communities and to remind readers just how fun it is share and talk over a great story.

Book Hunters in Brief #140: National Parks: Centennial Edition

As you have undoubtedly heard by now, this week is the centennial of our beloved National Parks. Celebrate the occasion with these great reads!

Book Hunters in Brief #138: The Olympics

This week, Book Hunters in Brief, along with the rest of the world, turns its attention to Rio and the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Library Superheros

The Bad-Ass Librarians of TimbuktuI am a librarian, so I feel duty-bound to read any book with a title like: The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts. Joshua Hammer has penned the story of the city's librarians who smuggled their rare manuscripts to safety through war-torn Al Quaeda territory. I wonder if they wore capes.... 

Book Hunters in Brief #135: On the Campaign Trail

For the life of me, I cannot figure out why anyone would want to be president. Sure, even if you do a lousy job (maybe especially if you do a lousy job) you get your picture in the history books.

Still, If you think about it, it's really just a glorified temp job and the whole country is your janus-headed supervisor.

You say, "But you get to be leader of the free world!" I say "leader" is probably too strong a term. At best you're a cat-herder and half of the cats aren't going to do what you say no matter what just because you vote blue and they vote red or vice versa.

Who needs that kind of aggravation?

Our Future World

You jump in your automated car to pick up some prescription medicine tailored to your DNA. While you're waiting at the store, a space tourism brochure pops into your VR headset. Once the personalized medicine is ready, you ask your automated car to pull up the navigation route for a popular restaurant where the 3D printer at the table will create your appetizer before the main course arrives. Is this the year 2041? Maybe. Maybe not.

Predicting the future is a tricky endeavor. Even so, some authors have attempted the feat. Read about their thoughts in these books and see if you agree with their future forecasts.

 

Big Stories Told Small

Authors often write about expansive topics and big ideas in their books. Sometimes, though, they choose to write about smaller subjects that impact us all the same. Try a few of these microhistory books on topics you probably haven't thought much about - until now:

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