Nonfiction

Book Hunters in Brief #75: Remembering

Book Hunters offer these suggestions for your Memorial Day reading.

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery: Where War Comes Home by Robert M Poole

War by Sebastian Junger

For Love of Country: What Our Veterans Can Teach Us About Citizenship, Heroism, and Sacrifice by Howard Shultz and Rajiv Chandrasekaran

The Soldiers’ Tale: Bearing Witness to Modern War by Samuel Hynes

A Gift of Valor: A War Story by Michael M. Phillips
 

We at Harris County Public Library would like to express our gratitude to the families of the men and women who have fallen in service to this country. We are forever in your debt.

Writer Spotlight: Erik Larson

If you enjoy historical nonfiction, don't miss the work of New York native Erik Larson. Larson's brand of narrative nonfiction has been a hit on many bestseller lists, starting with a book written in 1999 recalling the Great Storm of 1900 in Galveston. He currently occupies the #10 spot on the New York Times nonfiction list with his latest book,

There's No Word for That

Lost in TranslationDo the Eskimos really have over 60 words to describe snow?  I don't know, but after reading Lost in Translation by Ella Frances Sanders, I know that there’s a Finnish word for the distance a reindeer can travel before needing to rest.  And a Japanese word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees.  See what words you find.

Book Hunters in Brief #72: Happy Birthday, Orson!

The mass market wine ads and way too many appearances on the Tonight Show aside (not to mention the famously prodigious appetites and the girth to go with them), Orson Welles was not the peaked-by-thirty, riding-on-his-younger self's-coattails punch line that many seem to remember him as these days.

Or maybe he was...

Book Hunters in Brief #71: Jazz Appreciation Month

From the 1920s well into the 1950s, the soundtrack of life in this country was jazz in various forms, and why not? The American Century needed its distinctly American music, and jazz is just that. Its deepest and strongest roots may be in Africa, but it was the intertwining of those roots with European traditions that made jazz what it is. It is the music of the "Melting Pot." For every Armstrong and Ellington there was a Beiderbecke and Goodman. To say jazz is "as American as Apple Pie" is to undersell its American-ness. It could not have come to be anywhere else.

Partying Like Crazy

I Like You: Hospitality Under the InfluenceWhether you're planning a party or planning to go to a party, you'll find plenty of help from Amy Sedaris.  Check out I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence.  And may I suggest you listen to the audiobook read by Amy herself.  You'll laugh til you cry.

Cleanliness is Next to Happiness

Clear the Clutter, Find HappinessCleaning up the clutter and organizing any part of your life can brighten your day.  I believe it and so does Donna Smallin who recently came out with the book Clear the Clutter, Find Happiness: One-Minute Tips for Decluttering and Refreshing Your Home and Your Life.  It's a cute little book and full of helpful ideas.

Book Hunters in Brief #65: March Madness!

The clocks have sprung for spring. my lawn is overgrown with dandelions, and hares from Hong Kong to Halifax are hippity-hoppitying around with manic gleams in their beady little eyes, so that means College Basketball's contribution to the general looniness of the season cannot be far behind. 

The Book Hunters--never ones to sit idly by while others merrily run amok--have done their part. Here are a few suggestions to get you psyched for wall-to-wall hoop action for the next three weeks.

Book Hunters in Brief #64: Teen Tech Week 2015

March 8 - 14 is Teen Tech Week and this year's theme is "Libraries Are For Making," Harris County Public Library's Book Hunters have some suggestions to spark your creativity.

The Story of Astoria

Astoria by Peter StarkHave you ever been to Astoria, Oregon?  You've seen it if you watched the movies Kindergarten Cop, The Goonies, Free Willy, and many more.  I happened upon it driving one day (which isn't that easy to do), and I was rendered speechless by the beauty of entering it by the bridge over the Columbia River.  I imagine John Jacob Astor's expedition group had much the same reaction to this unspoiled, unsettled area in the early 1800's.  Read about their thrilling and often tragic adventure in a new book called Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire by Peter Stark.

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