Authors

Good-by J. D. Salinger, 1919-2010

"What I was really hanging around for, I was trying to feel some kind of a good-by. I mean I've left schools and places I didn't even know I was leaving them. I hate that. I don't care if it's a sad good-by or a bad good-by, but when I leave a place I like to know I'm leaving it. If you don't, you feel even worse."

~J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye, Chapter 1

On the Shelf: Why My Third Husband Will Be a Dog

“I have never been in an accident, if you don’t count my two marriages.” So says New York Times bestselling author Lisa Scottoline in her collection of highly entertaining personal essays titled Why My Third Husband Will Be a Dog. The cute cover – a little dog in a coffee cup – caught my eye immediately, and though I’ve never read Scottoline’s novels, her promise of “amazing adventures of an ordinary woman” had me adding my name to the request list.

Erich Segal, 1937-2010

Love StoryWhen I was a young adult, I loved to read Erich Segal's books.  He passed away on Sunday in London.  His most famous book was Love Story, which was made into the 1970 movie of the same name starring Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw.

On the Shelf: A Reliable Wife

I never read historical (hysterical!) novels – never – and, with the exception of Robert B. Parker’s Jesse Stone and Sunny Randall series, I never read novels written by men. Then one of my tweeps (people I follow on Twitter) said she’d heard A Reliable Wife by Robert Goolrick – an historical novel written by a man – had been garnering rave reviews. I looked up the title in the Harris County Public Library catalog, read the short synopsis and requested a copy.

Caution: Ranger at Work

Arizona Ranger Sam Burrack generally likes to work alone. After all, his line of work is a dangerous business, and having to watch out for a partner can be a fatal distraction. For one thing, the kind of men he hunts down usually have no qualms about shooting you in the back, if they get the chance. For another, his partner is new to the Arizona Ranger force and still somewhat green, although game for anything that comes along.

On the Shelf: Her Fearful Symmetry

Curling up with a good book has always been one of the simple pleasures I enjoy most on a cold winter night (of which we’ve had many lately!). I tend toward contemporary women’s fiction and, as you may have noticed if you’ve read my blog on a regular basis, I especially like stories that are a bit different. The book that’s been keeping me company the past few evenings – Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger – is no exception.

Louis L'Amour's Treasure Mountain

Tell and Orrin are looking for their father who disappeared twenty years earlier. They want their Ma to rest easy and not fret about what became of him in her last years. So, they start their search in New Orleans, his last known location, with little to go on other than nerve and tenacity. But that’s nothing new for the Sacketts. They’ve been pretty much up against it since the family first came to this continent in the 1600s. 

CREAM OF THE CROP

I find it difficult to call any one author my favorite.  As soon as I limit myself to having one and only one preferred and beloved very special ANYTHING....writer, artist, song, season, ice cream flavor, cookie....invariably The Fates read my mind and with intentional irony and much mythological mirth cause me to be exposed to some brilliant new work or scene or taste sensation.  Nature is not particularly rooted in permanence, but now that I think about it, that isn't such a bad thing. 

The Wyatt Earp Faction

It is amazing, the number of times Wyatt Earp was shot at and never even wounded. Those who were close to him were usually not so fortunate. So much has been made of the gunfight at the O. K.

Spur Award Winner Deals Another Winning Hand

Set in New Mexico in 1898, at the time of the Spanish-American War, this story by three-time Spur Award winner Johnny D. Boggs serves up the stuff Hollywood westerns are made of. On his website Mr.

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